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Japan Finally Abandons Floppy Disks in Digital Transformation Push

world News

Japan has finally bid farewell to floppy disks in 2024, eliminating over 1,000 regulations that required their use for government document submissions. Digital Minister Taro Kono, who declared "war" on floppy disks in 2021, announced the victory on Wednesday, nearly three years later: "We have won the war on floppy disks!"Since his appointment, Kono has aimed to phase out outdated

technology, including efforts to eliminate fax machines. Despite Japan's historical reputation as a tech powerhouse, the country has struggled with digital transformation due to a strong resistance to change. For example, fax machines have remained prevalent in workplaces over emails, and previous attempts to remove them from government offices faced significant opposition.The announcement sparked discussions on Japanese social media. One

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user on X, formerly known as Twitter, called floppy disks a "symbol of an anachronistic administration," while another commented on the outdated nature of their use, suggesting it reflected an older demographic in the government. Some users expressed nostalgia, wondering if floppy disks would appear on auction sites.Floppy disks, invented in the 1960s, became obsolete in the 1990s with the

advent of more efficient storage solutions. The three-and-a-half inch disks, which could hold up to 1.44MB of data, were vastly outstripped by modern memory sticks. Sony, the last manufacturer of floppy disks, ceased production in 2011.As part of its effort to modernize its bureaucracy, Japan launched the Digital Agency in September 2021, led by Kono, to spearhead the nation's digital transformation.

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P. Saharan is a Writer at The Speed Express and has been covering the latest news. He covers a wide variety of news from early and late stage.

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